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21 / Genderescent / INTJ~INFJ
Art ~ Activism ~ Fandom


♪*‧͙·*ೄ Art Blog *ೄ‧͙·*♪


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Thousand Steps and Stars
lachicanarosie:

becauseofthiswoman:

Name: Gloria AnzalduaDates:1942-2004Why she rocks: She is the leading scholar of Chicano cultural theory and queer theory, and has written several books based on her life growing up on the Mexican-Texas border. She is well known for using a blend of languages in her writing to challenge her readers to decipher meanings on their own.
Quote: “Though we tremble before uncertain futures, may we meet illness, death and adversity with strength. May we dance in the face of our fears.”
Because of this woman… we have texts that challenge feminists and LGBT studies students to see issues from a multi-cultural perspective.


Bless this woman

As a queer chicanx, I’ve been reading a lot of her work recently and it resonates SO MUCH!I never knew the narratives that I live through and think about often would exist in the 80’s. ;v;
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lachicanarosie:

becauseofthiswoman:

Name: Gloria Anzaldua
Dates:1942-2004

Why she rocks: She is the leading scholar of Chicano cultural theory and queer theory, and has written several books based on her life growing up on the Mexican-Texas border. She is well known for using a blend of languages in her writing to challenge her readers to decipher meanings on their own.

Quote: “Though we tremble before uncertain futures, may we meet illness, death and adversity with strength. May we dance in the face of our fears.”

Because of this woman… we have texts that challenge feminists and LGBT studies students to see issues from a multi-cultural perspective.

Bless this woman

As a queer chicanx, I’ve been reading a lot of her work recently and it resonates SO MUCH!
I never knew the narratives that I live through and think about often would exist in the 80’s. ;v;

tutusandtinyhats:

This fat-positive documentary, Fattitude, looks awesome. Donate to their Kickstarter if you can, and signal-boost!

silversarcasm:

silversarcasm:

disabled people aren’t excused from ableism

like you can be disabled and still perpetuate ableism against other disabled people you don;t get to say ‘I have asthma so I can mock people’s spelling’

thinkmexican:

Stories From the Real Coachella

Below is an excerpt from “How the P’urhépechas Came to the Coachella Valley,” an oral history of Pedro Gonzalez, one of thousands of P’urhépecha farmworkers living and working in the Coachella Valley of California. In an interview, he recounted the history of the P’urhépecha migration that created the Duros and Chicanitas labor camps located on the Cahuilla Indian Reservation:

I grew up in Ocomichu, Michoacán, which is a P’urhépecha town. When I was growing up, nobody knew how to speak Spanish. When you asked something in Spanish while they were working in the fields they would run, because they didn’t understand what you were saying. You suffer when you don’t know the language. My father wasn’t P’urhépecha, though, just my mother, so he taught us Spanish when we were young.

I first came to the U.S. in 1979. When I first arrived in Riverside I didn’t get a paycheck for two weeks. We survived off tortillas and oranges. We were working in the orange fields, and ate them for every meal. Someone lent us a couple of dollars and we would buy a package of tortillas. We needed to help each other, even when someone just needed a dollar. I just felt like crying back then, not knowing what to do.

Today in Duros or Mecca you can practically go anywhere and speak P’urhépecha with anyone. It wasn’t like that when I got here. I didn’t have anyone to talk to. I lived with an African-American man in Palm Springs for two months and felt very lonely. Nowadays the younger generation says our memories of what we suffered are exaggerated. That makes me feel bad. We walked two nights and two days crossing the border back then. Now it costs as much as $3,000 to cross the line. You have to work for more than two or three months to earn that much. It used to be that you didn’t have to pay another person to help you cross. Now it’s much harder and the coyotes charge so much. I used to help people cross for $300, and it was no big deal. I’ve helped others cross and they’ve never paid me. They forget.

I would say we have about three thousand P’urhépecha people in this area now. There are a lot of us. In Riverside alone I think there must be fifteen hundred people. Our hometown in Michoacán has also grown a lot. It used to be a small town, but it’s now a lot bigger. A few years back, they conducted a census in Mexico and determined there were about eight thousand indigenous people living in the hills of that area of Michoacán. I would say most are still there, but there are many of us now all over the U.S. We’re spread out in Palm Springs, Coachella, Indio, and Riverside.

Here in the Duros trailer park, there were only four trailers when I came in 1999. Slowly, people started arriving and everything started growing. Now I think there must be hundreds of people in these two parks, Duros and Chicanitas.

Most of us here work picking lemons and grapes, depending on the time of year. I like working the lemon harvest the most, because it pays piece rate (and not by the hour). If you work by the hour, it’s just over $7. On piece rate you can make about $1,550 every two weeks. If we do odd jobs here and there, it’s enough for us to live on. But piece rate makes you work fast, and some people don’t like it because they don’t like to work hard. For example, today I finished nine rows while some others only did five.

The owner of the park is a good man, a Native American. He even helped me fill out the immigration paperwork for my family, and only charged $500 when others would have charged $2,000.

But we used to have a lot of problems before the state took control of the park. A big one was the lack of security. Once, my wife heard knocking right after we’d left for work. She thought we’d come back, so she opened the door. It was an intruder. She yelled and he ran off, but the security guards wouldn’t do anything to protect us.

Rent on the trailer here costs us about $250, and with garbage, water, and security it goes up to $300 a month. If you’re getting paid $7 or $8 an hour, that’s hard. Gas prices keep going up and our wages don’t. Food prices are high. I spend more than $300 every time I buy food. If people got together and decided not to work for one day, it would have a tremendous impact on the economy; but people don’t do that because they are in need of money. We participated in a strike once. But there were other people who really needed work. They went into the fields to work even though we told them not to.

My kids are here legally now, and I’m in the process of obtaining legal residency for my last child. They all speak P’urhépecha, which is what we speak in the house. My wife doesn’t speak Spanish too well. She refused to learn it in the beginning because she said she wouldn’t need it. But now look at how necessary it is to speak English in this country. When my kids were young we had such a humble life in Mexico. They used to run around with holes all over their clothes. But our life has changed. Now if they have a little tear, they want to throw the clothes away. They even waste a lot of food. They don’t know how to value things. My family still has land in the ejido. My brother sold his plot when the land reform law changed, but I still have mine. My father died but my mother is still alive, and my wife’s mother is as well. We never forget about them, and send them money continuously. I don’t think my kids will return to Michoacán to live, though. Even though some were born over there, when we go to visit they always want to come back. But I don’t think they will lose their language and culture living here. We hold onto the P’urhépecha traditions with dances, weddings, baptisms, and quinceañeras. We all help each other out. There are many P’urhépechas here so everyone feels at home. I might go back to Mexico to live someday, but I don’t know when. I haven’t been there in years. I don’t even have my voter card. I’ve never voted in my life.

Read more at New America Media

Photos and interview by David Bacon

genderpunkenby:

male genitals are any genitals that belong to a person who identifies as male. Female genitals are any genitals that belong to a person who identifies as female. people who identify as nonbinary have nonbinary genitals. 

(Source: ihatecispeople)

ana-sthetic:

"Dont say you hate your fam-" No.

"Omg you should love your fami-" No.

"Be grateful they’re your famil-" No.

If you have been bullied, hit, teased, put down, hurt, lied to, or hated by your own family; you don’t need to justify how you feel. You dont need to explain yourself. You are allowed to hate a family member or dislike a family member if they’ve given you a reason to. You dont owe anyone anything.

the-wistful-collectivist:

sourcedumal:

theawesomesauce93:

coldfuckingsport:

disgracefullyriversong:

lovethroughthedarkdays:

gingersmaps:

Remember that time Disney made a live-action Cinderella adaptation with THREE WOC main characters — including Cinderella herself  and Whitney Houston’s Fairy Godmother — and a Filipino Prince Charming? And they didn’t spend a single second explaining through dialogue or sly witicism why they were cast that way, and the whole movie went on like it would with white actors and actresses, and the two main relationships were interracial and it was AMAZING?
Me, too.

i don’t think u understand my love for brandi’s cinderella like it’s possibly the greatest movie ever

this movie was so fucking perfect

I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again. We’re backsliding hard from the 90s.

This is the only Cinderella movie I care about. Besides the AWESOME diverse casting, the music was also great. 

This is the ONLY Cinderella

The 90s and the diversity in shows/movies + music was the best =/
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the-wistful-collectivist:

sourcedumal:

theawesomesauce93:

coldfuckingsport:

disgracefullyriversong:

lovethroughthedarkdays:

gingersmaps:

Remember that time Disney made a live-action Cinderella adaptation with THREE WOC main characters — including Cinderella herself  and Whitney Houston’s Fairy Godmother — and a Filipino Prince Charming? And they didn’t spend a single second explaining through dialogue or sly witicism why they were cast that way, and the whole movie went on like it would with white actors and actresses, and the two main relationships were interracial and it was AMAZING?

Me, too.

i don’t think u understand my love for brandi’s cinderella like it’s possibly the greatest movie ever

this movie was so fucking perfect

I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again. We’re backsliding hard from the 90s.

This is the only Cinderella movie I care about. Besides the AWESOME diverse casting, the music was also great. 

This is the ONLY Cinderella

The 90s and the diversity in shows/movies + music was the best =/

(Source: msdisneyqueen)

whitetears365:

Slurs are violent. They enact violence. They bring up violence. Slurs are used to dehumanize people, against their will.

plays

thinkmexican:

Mi Música: Mexican American Music of Today

Selena gives a lesson in what she knew best: music

This video is a look back to a different time for Mexicans in the United States. One before the globalization of NAFTA that led to the displacement and migration of millions from Mexico, and before Latino marketing would invade our cultural domain. A lot has changed. But rather than reminisce we should have a discussion as a community on where we’re at today and how we got here.

How many times did Selena use a term other than Mexican or Mexican American in this video? Exactly. The time before globalization and consumerism will never return, but we could do better. Let’s start by having that discussion.

In San Francisco last year, a man stabbed a woman in the face and arm after she didn’t respond positively to his sexually harassing her on the street.

In Bradenton, Fla., a man shot a high school senior to death after she and her friends refused to perform oral sex at his request.

In Chicago, a scared 15-year-old was hit by a car and died after she tried escaping from harassers on a bus.

Again, in Chicago, a man grabbed a 19-year-old walking on a public thoroughfare, pulled her onto a gangway and assaulted her.

In Savannah, Georgia, a woman was walking alone at night and three men approached her. She ignored them, but they pushed her to the ground and sexually assaulted her.

In Manhattan, a 29-year-old pregnant woman was killed when men catcalling from a van drove onto the sidewalk and hit her and her friend.

Last week, a runner in California — a woman — was stopped and asked, by a strange man in a car, if she wanted a ride. When she declined he ran her over twice.

FUCK YOU if you think that street harassment is a “compliment” or “no big deal” or that it’s “irrational” of us to be afraid because “what’s actually gonna happen.” Fuck you, fuck you, fuck you some more.

Street Harassment: Is a Man Running Over a 14-Year Old Girl for Refusing Sex Serious Enough? | Soraya Chemaly  (via mooncrumbs)

(Source: brutereason)

neongenesisevangelistchurch:

gorillazfan222222:

dellconahger:

when people draw fat/chubby characters skinny
image

when people don’t respect an artist style

if your drawing style is “completely eliminating a physical characteristic that is part of the character’s distinguishing features” you have a pretty shitty “artist style” and you really need to work on it

Fat femmes are very important.

weareallmixedup:


Hello! We’d love to see our fellow mixed-heritage community at Liberating Legacies - read more below. xo
Queer Rebels debuts Liberating Legacies, a FREE, ALL AGES, QUEER/TRANS PEOPLE OF COLOR ART SHOW. 13+ artists. One day only! 
WHEN: Sunday, April 20, 2014. TIME: 2-4pm
WHERE: San Francisco Public Library – Koret Auditorium, 100 Larkin Street, SF CA
MORE INFO: www.facebook.com/QRProductions
WHAT: Queer Rebels pays homage to the past and blazes new trails for our future. Let’s create freedom …liberating legacies for all genders and generations. This FREE program features a broad range of artists, from internationally known musicians like Earl Thomas, to youth talent such as Joshua Merchant and Star Amerasu, to experimental artists Jeepneys, Laura Hyunjhee Kim, and MOON RAY RA, to Bay Area locals such as Amir Rabiyah, BELLOWS, Jezebel Delilah X, Carrie Leilam Love, Fredrick Douglas Kakinami Cloyd, Lambert Moss, and MORE! Join us to celebrate new work by queer/trans artists of color – featuring fresh music, film/video, performance, and literary arts! Read more about the artists here: http://queerrebels.com/liberating-legacies/
ABOUT QUEER REBELS: Artists KB Boyce and Celeste Chan founded Queer Rebels in 2008. Their vision: to break down doors for queer artists of color, connect generations, and honor our histories with art for the future. Find out more: www.queerrebels.com and www.facebook.com/QRProductions
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weareallmixedup:

Hello! We’d love to see our fellow mixed-heritage community at Liberating Legacies - read more below. xo

Queer Rebels debuts Liberating Legacies, a FREE, ALL AGES, QUEER/TRANS PEOPLE OF COLOR ART SHOW. 13+ artists. One day only!

WHEN: Sunday, April 20, 2014. TIME: 2-4pm

WHERE: San Francisco Public Library – Koret Auditorium, 100 Larkin Street, SF CA

MORE INFO: www.facebook.com/QRProductions

WHAT: Queer Rebels pays homage to the past and blazes new trails for our future. Let’s create freedom …liberating legacies for all genders and generations. This FREE program features a broad range of artists, from internationally known musicians like Earl Thomas, to youth talent such as Joshua Merchant and Star Amerasu, to experimental artists Jeepneys, Laura Hyunjhee Kim, and MOON RAY RA, to Bay Area locals such as Amir Rabiyah, BELLOWS, Jezebel Delilah X, Carrie Leilam Love, Fredrick Douglas Kakinami Cloyd, Lambert Moss, and MORE! Join us to celebrate new work by queer/trans artists of color – featuring fresh music, film/video, performance, and literary arts! Read more about the artists here: http://queerrebels.com/liberating-legacies/


ABOUT QUEER REBELS: Artists KB Boyce and Celeste Chan founded Queer Rebels in 2008. Their vision: to break down doors for queer artists of color, connect generations, and honor our histories with art for the future. Find out more: www.queerrebels.com and www.facebook.com/QRProductions

So called ‘late-bloomers’ get a bad rap. Sometimes the people with the greatest potential often take the longest to find their path because their sensitivity is a double edged sword- it lives at the heart of their brilliance, but it also makes them more susceptible to life’s pains. Good thing we aren’t being penalized for handing in our purpose late. The soul doesn’t know a thing about deadlines.

Jeff Brown  (via thatkindofwoman)

(Source: venuschild)

silversarcasm:

[Gifset: Laverne Cox speaks at the GLAAD media awards, she says,

"Each and every one of us has the capacity to be an oppressor. I want to encourage each and every one of us to interrogate how we might be an oppressor, and how we might be able to become liberators for ourselves and each other."]

femmeanddangerous:

(x)

(Source: fuckyeahlavernecox)